Changing Habits and Back to School Tips

Fall is almost here, and the back-to-school supplies have been on display in stores for several weeks already. I’m sure kids aren’t ready to resume the schedule that being in class brings, however, there’s not much choice!

On the other hand, parents will likely be glad for schedules to begin again, when they know children will be safely in the classrooms for specific hours daily. So, it’s time to get organized and begin to retrain everyone. In the summer, we tend to relax some habits that we need when life is more structured, and need to be reinstituted for smooth living.

Start now by introducing the new habits, or getting back to the ones that work, until they’re internalized and automatic. Kids can:

1. Get back on schedule by going to bed a bit earlier at night and getting up a bit earlier in the morning. This will retrain sleep patterns.

2. Re-establish mealtime routines if they’ve been a bit lax.

3. Ensure their desk is clear and ready for the new homework season. Check to be sure the old chair is still ergonomically correct and fits them properly.

4. Take care when packing a backpack not to make it too heavy which will eventually cause back problems.

5. Choose clothing and prepare their backpack at night to help the morning flow more smoothly.

As parents, there are some things you can do too, to prepare for Day 1:

1. Check the lunch boxes from last June (if you haven’t already done so) to ensure they’re in good shape for another year.

2. If your child is going to a new school, make arrangements to visit the school before classes begin.

3. Institute an organizing system to store backpacks, lunch boxes, shoes, etc. so children can have a dedicated place for their own belongings when they come home, and act as a launching pad when they leave in the morning.

4. Post a calendar with large squares for each day in a place where the whole family has access to it. When children come home from school with their schedules, they can add their own activities to this calendar. A different color marker for each child will simplify identifying each one’s activities.

5. Decide on a system for posting your children’s artwork. If you don’t already have one, here are some ideas:
a. Scan the pieces you like best and use them as your screensaver and send to family and friends,
b. Keep the best ones in a clean pizza box, one per child per year, and write the year on the outside of the box. These will stack nicely on an upper shelf.
c. Display only one piece at a time to keep clutter to a minimum. Have each child decide whether to post the new piece or leave the old one up.
d. Set up a clothesline-type display so artwork can be hung with clothespins.

6. Have sports equipment cleaned and ready for wearing. Think hockey for winter and anything else for other seasons. Not only will it look better, proper cleaning will remove any mold that has taken up residence so the equipment is healthier to wear.

7. Enjoy one more end-of-summer or back-to-school party to celebrate the fun you’ve had and look forward to the new school year and all the good things that will bring.

Most of all, enjoy the time with each other and continue to make happy memories. It’s all about being organized, after all.

Moreen Torpy is the De-Clutter Coach, a Trained Professional Organizer, Author, and Speaker. Let’s Get Organized: 172 tiplets to simplify life is her first published work. See http://www.decluttercoach.ca to subscribe to Let’s Get Organized, her monthly e-zine and purchase the booklet. Also, http://www.GreatOrganizingBooks.com to find your favorite organizing book!

Article 346: Nine ways to Changing Child’s Eating Habits

Hasan A. Yahya, PhDs. A writer from Michigan, USA.

It’s no surprise that fast food plays a large part in the diet of most Americans. We’ve seen the effects that dietary degradation can have upon our health. More  and more children, from 3 to 9 are suffering from obesity. A good portion of pre-school children are overweight. Children that are overweight are at an increased risk for health problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes and other conditions. Parents often complain that their children are picky eaters. And they  should re-evaluate the eating habits of the whole family. It is time for mothers to try new ways to produce and present food to their children. Here are some ways to change your child habits of eating:

Keep in mind that more calories don’t necessarily mean more nutrition. Ask your child for his or her opinion.
Write a list of your child’s favorite foods then look through recipes for different ways to prepare those foods while integrating new foods into your meals.
It is normal to receive your child rejection to some foods, your child will not like every food you serve. That’s okay. Like yourself, probably certain foods that you don’t like. So, your child doesn’t have to like every food in order to eat healthy.
Let them share food preparing: Get the kids  involved. Let them help you prepare a meal.  Prepare a food that you normally don’t include in your regular meals. Try a new recipe.
You are the role model for your children: Set a good example for your children through your own healthy eating habits. Break up the mealtime routine.
The factor of child personality:  Your child personality  plays a great role when it comes to how he or she will respond to new foods. It’s important to understand your child’s personality as you are offering up a world of food to her/him.  Children usually respond by behaving in the way that gets them attention. If they are labeled as picky, as they will act that way and thus exacerbate the problem. Specialists suggest that you try not to react dramatically  if your child turns his nose up to a food and resist the urge to label him as ‘the hater of all that is green.’  He will pick up on your reaction and repeat his behavior again and again.
There are ways to help children expand their dietary delights. Keep trying new dishes. Add a variety of foods. Don’t get stuck in the rut of preparing the same meals repeatedly. If children say they don’t like a particular food encourage them to taste it but don’t try to force them to eat it. Try the same food again at a later time or use the same food in a different way.
Repetition of providing food several times:  Research shows that it takes 8 to 15 times of introducing a new food to a child for him to accept it. This means  that you need to offer that food an average of 10 times before your child will consider eating it. 
 Studies have shown that food preferences are shaped between the ages of three and five.  In many cases, be patient, and repeat doing the same thing one more time. Sure! you will succeed. (571 words) wwwaskdryahya.com

Sources: http://livingstonparentjournal.com/

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/125373/how_to_change_your_childs_eating_habits_pg2.html?cat=25

Professor, Dr. Hasan A. Yahya is an Arab American writer, scholar, and professor of Sociology lives in the United States of America,  originally from Palestine. He graduated from Michigan State University with  2 Ph.d degrees. He published 65 books plus , and 500 plus articles on sociology, religion, psychology, politics, poetry, and short stories. Philosophically, his writings concern logic, justice and human rights worldwide. Dr. Yahya is the author of Crescentologism: The Moon Theory,  and  Islam Finds its Way, on Amazon. He’s an expert on Race Relations, Arab and Islamic cultures, he is also, interested in religion, world affairs and  global strategic planning for justice and human rights. www.dryahyatv.com